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Hurtado on Jesus


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#1 Fortigurn

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Posted 21 August 2011 - 11:39 PM

Larry Hurtado has been at the forefront of studies on whether or not Jesus thought and spoke of himself as divine, and whether the original Christian community understood him to be God.

These recent comments from Hurtado speak volumes when read with care.

“To come clean, I confess to being guilty of the Christian faith (though, Christians being what we are, not every one will be satisfied with my version of Christian faith!). But I do not believe that the religious validity of a Christian christological conviction necessarily rests upon the time or manner of its appearance in history. [...] I do not think it is necessary for Jesus to have though and spoken of himself in the same terms that his followers thought and spoke of him in the decades subsequent to his crucifixion in order for the convictions of these followers to be treated as valid by Christians today.”


Source.

#2 Ken Gilmore

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Posted 22 August 2011 - 01:28 AM

Larry Hurtado has been at the forefront of studies on whether or not Jesus thought and spoke of himself as divine, and whether the original Christian community understood him to be God.

These recent comments from Hurtado speak volumes when read with care.

“To come clean, I confess to being guilty of the Christian faith (though, Christians being what we are, not every one will be satisfied with my version of Christian faith!). But I do not believe that the religious validity of a Christian christological conviction necessarily rests upon the time or manner of its appearance in history. [...] I do not think it is necessary for Jesus to have though and spoken of himself in the same terms that his followers thought and spoke of him in the decades subsequent to his crucifixion in order for the convictions of these followers to be treated as valid by Christians today.”


Source.

So, if some Christians today think and speak of Christ in terms not employed by followers in the decades subsequent to His crucifixion, will their Christological views be treated as valid by Christians today? Hmmm. Colour me quite interested.
“I do not feel obliged to believe that the same God who has endowed us with sense, reason, and intellect has intended us to forgo their use.” - Galileo Galilei

#3 Fortigurn

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Posted 22 August 2011 - 01:33 AM

It's the inevitable result of the data his own studies have brought to light. I see it as an apologetic for the trinitarian Christology which clearly has no first century support; 'We trinitarians may not speak of Jesus in the same Christological terms as he spoke of himself, but our views can still be valid for all that'.

Edited by Fortigurn, 22 August 2011 - 01:35 AM.


#4 Ken Gilmore

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Posted 22 August 2011 - 01:47 AM

It's the inevitable result of the data his own studies have brought to light. I see it as an apologetic for the trinitarian Christology which clearly has no first century support; 'We trinitarians may not speak of Jesus in the same Christological terms as he spoke of himself, but our views can still be valid for all that'.

The next question is whether he would now regard all current Christological views as having equal soteriological efficacy? After all, one would like to think the inheritors of the 1st century Christology would have some justification to see their views as having ontological primacy.
“I do not feel obliged to believe that the same God who has endowed us with sense, reason, and intellect has intended us to forgo their use.” - Galileo Galilei

#5 Fortigurn

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Posted 22 August 2011 - 01:59 AM

The next question is whether he would now regard all current Christological views as having equal soteriological efficacy? After all, one would like to think the inheritors of the 1st century Christology would have some justification to see their views as having ontological primacy.


Good question. I do think that his conclusion actually does lead towards the question you asked previously.

#6 Evangelion

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Posted 22 August 2011 - 02:20 AM

This is a significant concession, particularly coming from Hurtado.
'Abba Antony said, "A time is coming when men will go mad, and when they see someone who is not mad, they will attack him saying, 'You are mad, you are not like us.'"'

Ward, Benedicta. The Sayings of the Desert Fathers (2006), Antony 25, p. 5.

Credo.




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